Rant on Comcast/Xfinity Wednesday, May 24 2017 

I’m cool as a cucumber, calm as a gentle stream. I don’t get road rage—I’m the most patient driver on the road. I rarely get rattled caring for my husband with Alzheimer’s or rambunctious grandchildren. I really am typically easy-going.

Until I had to deal with Comcast/Xfinity.

Working with them after my recent move turned me into an angry person I didn’t recognize. One day, I even lost my temper and was nasty with reps. My blood pressure rises just thinking about them.

There were problems with the cable. A second TV didn’t work, and I was repeatedly told there was something wrong with my equipment. All of it magically failed overnight while moving. Actually, after a visit, the technician said the error was on their end.

Most frustrating were all the phone issues.

  • Comcast said I’d have the same phone number I’ve had for 30 plus years. It was originally issued by Illinois Bell, so that tells you how long I’ve had it. After several HOURS on the phone with Comcast, and a week later, I was told the temporary number they issued me will be my permanent one. It happens, they say. Even moving only 2-3 miles from my last home. Had I been told of the possibility from the beginning, I wouldn’t have wasted so many hours dealing with reps who repeatedly told me it would be another 24-48 hours. I would have waited to print “Just Moved” postcards to include my new phone number.
  • It took ten days and multiple calls to get a rep to update my online info so that I could see my account online.
  • I had no voice mail for 16 days. The prompt said my number was unavailable.
  • Caller ID continues to identify me by someone else’s name. Yesterday Comcast said they aren’t responsible for that. It is the slow processing of the providers of those I call, such as AT&T.

No doubt, all this rambling and ranting sounds familiar to many of you as you’ve had the same experience with carriers. They aren’t life-threatening problems but still, intensely irritating, particularly because of the waste of time. I lost countless hours that cost me work and pay.

And it’s been unnecessarily stressful. All reps were pleasant as they read their scripts but few could reason beyond their prescribed steps. It took multiple contacts before anything was resolved.

I guess it is the sign of the times. I moved 8 times with my previous number with AT&T and it was as simple as lifting up the phone in my new home to find it all working. But today we deal with too much technology, too little employee training, and the fact that these providers are so much in demand they needn’t care how the consumer feels.

I apologize for the rant. As you know, I strive to write positive posts, so perhaps I can assist you with your next move by warning you. Perhaps if I’d known all of this was likely, I would have taken it more in stride.

Direct Sales: Your Business Your Way Monday, Apr 3 2017 

My husband, Marshall, used to say that sales is the one business that has no limits. You control your amount of income and the number of hours you want to put into your career.

When my children were young, I sold Avon and Tupperware. These companies allowed me to make some good money with the flexibility needed while caring for three little ones.

Today we have many home-based direct sales businesses to choose from. Along with some personal contact, such as home parties, most lean more toward the utilization of social media than door-to-door sales as Avon once did. But they all offer an opportunity to own a business, be your own boss, and make it as successful as you want it to be.

Every company has their own twist in this very competitive market. For example, Beautycounter offers safer cosmetics and personal care products. Pampered Chef is known for quality kitchen items. And my favorite, Young Living, carries a wide-range of pure essential oils. I promote Young Living while also pursuing my writing career, public speaking, and working as a trade rep for my publisher.  (If you decide to purchase or join Young Living, please use my full name as a reference – Mary Doyle Brodien)

Other home-based direct sales companies include Scentsy, Jamberry, Younique, tastefullysimple, 31 Bags, Norwex, Shaklee, Damsel in Defense, Stella & Dot, Rodan & Fields, Origami Owl, Lilla Rose, and Mary Kay.

Self-employment comes with as many challenges as there are rewards. If you’re interested in following the direct-sales path, here are some points to consider:

  • Will you be selling a product you personally use and value?
  • Is there a start-up fee or requirement?
  • Must you meet a certain quota?
  • Do you have friends, family members, and neighbors who you believe will be interested in what you sell?
  • Are you comfortable reaching out and talking up the products you sell?
  • Are you disciplined enough to market, sell, collect, and maintain records for tax purposes?
  • Do you want to work this business as your part-time or full-time employment?
  • If this is your sole income, can you support yourself when sales are low or non-existent?
  • Can you afford your own medical insurance?
  • Are the hours you hope to work this job doable with your current family/employment situation?

(To see my posts on topics relating to my book, go to Mary K Doyle Books.)

Your Next Home Wednesday, Jan 11 2017 

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There is little I understand about the housing market today. My house has been on the market for a year and a half. I’ve learned some important lessons along the way but other things continue to baffle me.

The most important lesson I’ve learned is to hire a local realtor. The first year I used a very nice, experienced realtor from a distant suburb. We’d previously met, and I thought it would be good to work with someone familiar.

Unfortunately, he priced my home considerably higher than the local market would tolerate. I only had two showings over the year, and that affects the current rating of the home. Potential buyers question why the house has not sold by now.

I also have since learned that local realtors are reluctant to show a home with an outside listing realtor. I don’t understand why, but I guess it is part of the industry.

My current realtor sells well in this area. Katie’s priced the home competitively and staged it to present well. She suggested I remove my dated and religious personal articles. She also brought in a few accent pieces.

Katie also hired a professional photographer for clear, crisp photos. Home shopping today begins online, and that listing is key to getting buyers to look at the house.

Our home is spacious, bright, and open. It’s also one of the cleanest you’ll ever see. We’ve entertained considerably here as my husband and I have a large circle of family and friends. And Marshall had an extensive museum in our basement which drew more visitors than I can possibly estimate.

So this is what baffles me. I understand after seeing the home that a buyer may comment something such as “I don’t like the floor plan.” That’s something we feel when we enter a home, and often that can’t be changed.

What I don’t get is when they say:

  • They don’t want to live on a golf course.—This house is on a golf course, in a golf community.
  • I don’t want to live on that street.—They know the address when they view the listing.
  • The house is too big—The square footage is noted in the listing.
  • And my favorite, the buyer couldn’t get over that we had a microwave on the counter.—No worries, people! I won’t leave the microwave behind.

Then there is the kitchen—It’s bright, efficient, and basic. I’ve cooked more here than I can imagine any future homeowner ever will. Everything works and works well. But it appears that not only do current buyers want updated counters and high-end appliances, they want them to their particular specifications.

There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t give thanks for the blessing of living in my home. I can’t imagine that I will live anywhere more luxurious. It’s been a haven of joy and love. And we have wonderful neighbors. But now it is time for me to move into something significantly smaller.

May the next family here be as happy as we have been. Is that you?

(Check out my home here.And don’t forget to see my blog: Mary K Doyle Books.)

Socks, Please Santa Thursday, Dec 15 2016 

 

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The snow glitters in the blowing wind. Trees and decks and shrubs and ground are dusted in sparkling white snow. So pure, clean—and deceivingly inviting. The temperatures are frigid today, and so are we the moment we step outside.

It looks like we will have a cold winter this year in the U.S. Midwest and North, so we might think about adding socks to our list for Santa and purchasing a pair or two for someone in a homeless shelter. We’ll all endure the winter so much better if we do.

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Women’s fashions aren’t always thoughtful of what we ladies must endure. Live through a number of seasons and we encounter countless summers and winters when we are dressed for looks but not comfort. I know I’ve had too many summers when I was dressed too warm and too many winters when I could have had a few more yards of fabric on me!

A positive trend this winter season are knee and above socks. They’ve been out of fashion, and difficult to find, for many years. We have them back in full swing right now.

Neutral to an array of fun designs are available. We also have leg warmers again. I tried a pair yesterday, and I was amazed at how much warmer I was without the cold air penetrating my jeans. They were only $7 at Marshall’s, but the cute socks are more in the $15-$20 range.

(Why not check out my website or author Facebook page?)

 

Stop! Reflect! Give Thanks! Wednesday, Nov 23 2016 

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I’m not one to long for the past. My life’s been a mix of extremes—excellent and dreadful times. I look back on the good ones with gratitude and prefer not to relive those that were difficult.

However, I do miss the Thanksgivings of my childhood. Thanksgiving weekend was relaxing. We laid around through the weekend, savored the leftovers, watched tv, and visited friends and family. We were happy doing nothing! The Christmas chaos didn’t begin for weeks.

There’s no down time anymore. We clear the lavish Thanksgiving table without digesting that last piece of pumpkin pie, and are off and running through the New Year. There’s so much to do: shopping, wrapping, card writing, baking, cooking, and partying.

Please don’t let this very important holiday pass without a moment of pause. Reflect on our abundance and give thanks. Acknowledge our many blessings and appreciate the food and friendship around us. These are the riches of life.

Not Voting is Voting Friday, Oct 14 2016 

The current presidential campaign is not a proud moment in American history. Although there are voters who strongly favor one or the other of the candidates, many, perhaps the majority, find ourselves in a quandary. We dislike both candidates so much that we defend the one we believe to be the lesser of two evils. We are placing our hope for the future in someone we cautiously think will do the least harm to our economy, security, principles, and image.

The current point of contention between the candidates’ is their treatment of women. Both are trying to draw women voters to their side, not because of what they will do for women, but the despicable manner in which the other candidate treats them. One has video and sound tracks making demeaning comments about women and allegations of groping. The other is accused of bullying and intimidation after numerous women claimed her husband sexually assaulted them, causing a double-punch to those victims.

So many voters are so unhappy with both candidates that they will not vote at all. However, that does not change our responsibility to do so. In fact, it is as powerful as casting a vote because not voting is voting for the winner.

We can’t get out of our responsibility to participate in this election. We have to make a decision.

Please God, bless America.

Lemons into Lemonade Monday, Jul 8 2013 

Life often makes us experts on topics we’d rather not know about – cancer, combat, financial downfall, sexual assault, divorce, death of a loved one and so on. We never wanted our life-focus to be in that direction. The life-changing situation was thrust upon us, and here we are.

For a rare few, although devastated by the event at the time, it was a mere blimp on their radar. They dealt with the situation and put it behind them.

Others get stuck there. They rerun and re-experience it endlessly. They are crippled by what happened to them, and everything else in their life falls apart.

Most try to turn at least a smidgen of their pain into something positive. They learn from the experience and pass on their new knowledge, helping others to get through a similar problem. They vow to live differently – in a more positive and meaningful way.

It’s not so much what happens to us but how we deal with our great challenges that make our life story interesting and memorable. We aren’t the only person to experience what we did, but that added to the rest of our experiences and personality, and how we use all, is what makes us special.

©2013, Mary K. Doyle

Now You See It. Now You Don’t. Tuesday, Aug 14 2012 

Magic is easy, once you know the secret. At least that is what my husband, Marshall Brodien, always says. And life is like that too. If you know the secrets of life, it is so much easier.

In fact, there are several principles of magic that can be applied to life. Here are a few life-lessons I’ve learned from magic:

  1. What appears to be very mysterious often is quite simple.
  2. There are a whole lot of things going on around you that you don’t see.
  3. Some people intentionally misdirect your attention from what’s important.
  4. Every industry has a personality and magicians are no different. Actually, they are very different.
  5. You don’t need to know how everything works. Sometimes it’s best to relax and enjoy the show.
  6. Some careers are more fun than work.
  7. You don’t have to accept the “cards” forced upon you.
  8. Even when the magic doesn’t go as planned, you must keep moving on with the show.
  9. No matter how talented or industrious you are, your audience may not applaud you.
  10. Your presentation is more important than your ability.

©Mary K. Doyle

(Photo by Stephanie Maury. Used with permission.)

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