Junk Food Junkies Wednesday, Sep 18 2019 

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Skip the meals and go straight to the munchies. Granola bars, cookies, nuts, potato chips, popcorn, candy, pretzels, ice cream. We’re a snacking society. Not only do we snack all day and night, main meals are often replaced with snacks as well. All these goodies can add up to significantly more calories if we don’t choose our foods wisely.

We make more than 200 decisions about food each day, and most are made unconsciously. Rarely do we choose to eat because we are hungry. Instead, we’re prompted by outer influences—stress, a clock that says that it is meal time, boredom, or a reward.

And we eat more when distracted watching TV, listening to music, playing a game, reading, or worse, the food is just present. Studies show that if offered an unlimited amount of food, particularly when empty plates are continuously cleared away, we will eat 73% more than we would otherwise. Who doesn’t eat at work simply because the food is in front of us? It may not even be items we particularly care for, but there it is, so we fill a plate and mindlessly munch while working.

We can consume fewer calories if we use smaller plates, select from smaller containers, decrease the variety of choices on hand so we don’t sample all that is out, don’t buy in bulk, choose healthy foods only, and keep higher calorie ones in areas that are difficult to retrieve, or better yet, not bring them into the home or office. Although all foods contain calories, choosing grapes, almonds, carrots, cheddar cheese, and dark chocolate offer significantly more nutritional value than potato chips, gummy worms, and crackers.

We also should avoid late-night snacks. Although that is when we are more likely to be drawn to high-calorie foods, studies find that food isn’t as satisfying at night. We can end up eating more and choosing foods that are the least healthy.

We’ll also eat less if we eat slowly. Since we’re influenced by the people we eat with, dining with a slower eater can help us slow down. Taking at least 20-30 minutes to finish a meal allows our body to release hormones that promote feelings of fullness.

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Breakfast or an All-Day Snack Sunday, May 17 2015 

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but I have a recipe for you that you’ll want to munch on all day long. I’ve been perfecting my granola recipe for more than six months and have it right where I want it. I think you’ll like it too.

Oatmeal is a super food that should be in all of our diets. I don’t mind cooked oatmeal, but can only eat it a couple of times a month at best. Toasted oatmeal is another matter. A sweet, salty, crunchy granola has definitely turned this non-cereal lover into one. The coconut oil and pecans in this recipe makes it healthier yet!

Oatmeal contains two types of fiber: soluble which absorbs water and is fermented by bacteria and insoluble which does not absorb water or ferment. Both have health benefits.

The fiber in oatmeal helps to decrease LDL cholesterol, (the bad cholesterol), as well as high blood pressure and the risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. It helps control blood sugar by slowing down digestion time. Fiber also makes us feel fuller longer, reducing overeating and the bulk cleans us out reducing the risk of colon cancer.

Why don’t you give this very quick and easy recipe a try and let me know what you think.

 

Mary Doyle’s Granola

2 cups regular oatmeal – rolled outs*

¼ cup chopped pecans

¼ cup coconut oil, softened

¼ cup butter, softened

½ cup brown sugar, packed

1 teaspoon vanilla

¾ teaspoon salt

Mix the oatmeal, brown sugar, pecans and salt in a bowl. Blend coconut oil, butter, and vanilla. Combine the dry and soft mixtures together. You may want to toss with your hands.

Spread the mixture across a cookie sheet. Bake 350 for about 15 minutes. Turn once or twice during baking. Watch carefully. The granola quickly goes from brown to burnt.

*Do not use instant oats—which is too soft—or steel cut—which is too gritty.

©2015, Mary K. Doyle

 

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